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20121201
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Search Results 0 to 32 of about 33 (some duplicates have been removed)
with a daring new plan to save greece. >> welcome back. greece has announced a plan to buy back bonds as part of its effort to reduce its debt load. >> the success of the plan is essential to unlocking the next payment of eight athens, but it is still uncertain whether it will work -- of aid to a thens, but it is still uncertain whether it will work. >> german finance minister wolfgang schaeuble and his french counterpart, pierre moscovici, went in front of parliament. >> things have to move fast. there is no reason to worry. the calculations are realistic. i hope it works. >> there is no plan b. >> the finance ministers brushoff warnings that the programs might not reduce greek debt enough. spain has formally asked for almost 40 billion euros in aid for its troubled banking sector. >> a strong indication that we have been successful in stabilizing the eurozone. spain now leads -- need less than originally assumed. the situation has improved. >> another trouble spot is cyprus. the country needs a bailout of between 10 billion euros and 17 billion euros. officials are waiting for our report on
? check out greece. that's what happens when a country avoids making tough fiscal decisions for too long. >>> a top republican pollster about what went wrong on their side. a lot of information coming here and why if republicans don't change the way they do business they may be on the losing end of elections for years to come. plus, the black helicopter crowd is at it again. republicans in the senate reject a united nations treaty to ban discrimination against the disabled. they say it would allow u.n. officials to come into this country and force home-schooled children into government-run, that is public schools. senator john kerry joins us to cut through the nonsense. >>> also tonight, the simpson's mr. burns gives us a rich man's look at the fiscal cliff. >> think of the economy as a car and the rich man is the driver. if you don't give the driver, he'll drive you over a cliff. >> that's an aside show and this is "hardball," the place for politics. >>> never too early for pollsters to start head to 2016. guess who's looking very strong? hillary clinton. a new abc news/washington post
, european finance ministers have said yes to releasing more aid to greece. in a 50 billion euros were freed up on thursday for athens -- >> the 50 billion euros were freed up on thursday for athens. >> there are some who believe it is nothing more than a band-aid. >> emotions spilled over as workers tried to storm a meeting between greek and german officials today are angry over layoffs that are part of broad austerity measures. greeks see the reason to believe next year will be any better. >> they may receive the tranche, but it would be spent in a few months. we will soon be asking for more money. i don't see how that will help the economy. >> one minister remains hopeful, consulting with his counterparts on how to get the economy back on its feet. >> we want to work together to organize a support fund to promote economic growth in greece. >> but that would require attracting private investors. to do that, greece must first settle it unpaid bills. >> of the 9 billion euros that greece still owes, we will pay back everything by 2013 in accordance with the troika deal. >> so, for now, greek
would love to, thank you. >>> greece has become the gateway to hundreds of thousands of migrants to enter the country, many of them muslims. athens remains the only eu capital without unofficial moscow. now there are plans to build one next year. will the bankrupt companies -- will the bankrupt country have trouble delivering? >> underground, crowded, a legal, the place of worship for muslims and athens. dozens of these poor rooms serve be a huge community. -- dozens of these prior rooms serve out a huge community. >> we respect all religions, but they did not have the respect of our muslims to provide as a regular, legal mosque for our workshop. >> the shadow of a now distant past. no mosques have been built in athens since christian greece gained independence in 1832, the omi e.u. capital without. but could that change? this was the site chosen for the first mosque. but previous promises have come to nothing in there is a financial crisis. >> there was a fear in the greek society about the construction of a mosque. we must overcome these fears. it is the commitment of the greek
, the you chose not to abandon them, but greece continues to have to make drastic cuts, leaving marks that are visible throughout the country, including a long one of the world's most famous routes -- along one of the world's most famous routes. ♪ >> at precisely 42,195 meters long, this is the route that has become the standard for all marathon runners. the course was inspired by a 2500-year old myth, only today it is run on asphalt along with the capital's main roads. this is the bay where it said the lenda battle took place in 490 bc. it marked the first greek victory over the persians. according to legend, the athenian warriors gathered in a phalanx formation and managed to fight off a persian invasion. then a messenger ran the 42- kilometer distance to athens with news of the victory. at the local museum, the marathon's legacy is omnipresent. more modern-day hellenistic heroes have also been demoralize here. for instance, marathon runner who won the first olympic marathon in 1896. >> exactly like the car which they gave to the winner. >> at the eight-kilometer mark, there are r
in neighboring turkey, lebanon, and jordan. a much smaller number have made their way to greece. this report from lesbos just off the coast of turkey. >> the immigrants who wash ashore on the greek islands are now struggling with their first european winter. they are somalis, afghanistan annies, and, increates -- increasingly, syrians. all at a camp run by volunteers who provide food and shelter the this is ahmed, who has just arrived from aleppo with a vague plan to find his brothner athens. >> our life is destroyed in syria. we cannot stay in syria. the war airplanes float in the sky and bombing the houses, we cannot stay in syria. >> the turkish mainland is not far behind me. it's not far away but the journey is very dangerous. the boats supplied by people smugglers are often old and in bad condition, and at this time be year the seas could be very rough. not everyone makes it across. these were afghanis. more than 20 drowned. here is the only survivor, who was fished half-dead and freezing cold out of the sea by greek coast guards. now trying to call friends and family to tell them he's alive
greece would have a worse depression than the great depression in the u.s. >> brown: a player in campaign politics, but what of the current debt debate? we talk with tea party ally, matt kibbe. >> warner: and as e.p.a. chief lisa jackson steps down, we assess the track record of the administration's environmental agency. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> warner: five days and counting with plenty of tit-for- tat charges, but no agreement in sight. that, in short, summed up the state of affairs in washington today as the fiscal cliff deadline loomed, january
. and jeffrey brown samples the poetry about greece's financial woes and its austerity measures. >> we'll hock the person to buy our bread. if you believe the headlines, then we're sunk. greece downgraded deeper into junk. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour.n >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the bill and melinda gates foundation. dedicated to the idea that all people deserve the chance to live a healthy, productive life. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> ifill: much of the world paused today to observe christmas. the day brought all the traditional rites of faith for christians and a new urgency to calls for calm in the troubled corners of the globe. thousands of the faithful greeted pope benedict xvi today at his cal bony overlooking st. peter's square. in that timeless setting,
; the impact of austerity in greece; the tea party and the fiscal cliff and the administration's environmental record. but first, the other news of the day. here's kwame holman. >> holman: wall street was down much of the day, but trimmed its losses after news that the house will convene sunday to focus on the fiscal cliff. in the end, the dow jones industrial average shed 18 points to close at 13,096. the nasdaq fell four points to close under 2,986. also today, the labor department reported the number of new claims for unemployment benefits fell this week to the lowest level since march of 2008. president obama is urging dockworkers and shippers to avoid a crippling strike at atlantic and gulf coast ports. it would be the first since 1977. the workers' union contract expires this weekend, and a white house spokesman said today the two sides need to agree on a contract extension as soon as possible. talks broke down last week in a dispute over wages and royalties. the christmas season storm that blasted the south and midwest swept across the upper northeast and new england today and the death
is your equivalent of in greece, a permanent bailout. the thing is, whereas markets are an easing institutions for -- are amazing institutions for allocating existing goods and services among consumers, they are chronically bad at creating a surplus between deficit -- at creating a balance between deficit and surplus regions. a geographic problem, and intertemporal. remember -- if that comes first, suddenly the money lender who later becomes a banker who later becomes wall street plays a hugely significant role in this process. the banker is the conduct of that -- conduit of that recycling mechanism. when they get an increase in proportion as the result of their mediation of that process. given that, a failure of the banker is the same thing as -- is not the same thing as the failure of a clothes maker. suddenly, there are two things that must have been. -- happen. 1 -- society will demand that banks are not allowed to go to the wall. then bankers are affectively given carte blanche, free money for themselves. and the whole mechanism breaks down in 2008. -- like in 2008. it is of
. >> thanks for joining us. another moment of truth for athens -- when greece finds out weather its author -- offer to repurchase debt from private investors has paid off. that will help trigger the release of more rescue funds that greece so desperately needs to stay afloat. >> athens has offered to pay 10 billion euros to holders of its sovereign debt at a buyback value of up to 40 cents per euro. to be successful, the sale has to cut a greek national debt by 20 billion euros. news from athens made investors nervous this friday. our correspondence sent us this report from the frankfurt stock exchange. >> the suspense on the stock trading floor that weather or not the creditors of greece would take part in the debt buyback was too much for many investors. they decided to take some of the book's profits and sell shares. shares of deutsche telekom were the biggest dax losers. in order to invest money into new technologies such as broadband networks, they decided to cut the dividend for investors. now, many people here fear that this is something that more companies might do also next year,
fleeing are going to greece. >> the emigrants' washing ashore are now struggling with their first european winter. they are from somalia, afghanistan, increasingly syrian. all on a camp that is run by volunteers to provide food and shelter. he has just arrived from aleppo with a vague plan to find his brother in athens. >> our live was assured in syria. we cannot stay in syria. there were bombs attacking the houses. we cannot stay in syria. >> this is where many people cross over to the greek island from turkey. it is seen in the distance behind me. it is not far away, but the journey is dangerous. the boats used are often in battered conditions and at this time of year, the seas can be very rough. not everyone makes it across. more than 20 drowned from this group and here is the only survivor who was finished half dead out of the sea by the greek coastguard. they're now trying to call friends and family to tell them he is alive. he is receiving counseling, but he seems very confused about what to do next. meanwhile, more and more syrians are arriving in athens who know no one in this city
corruption by local officials. and jeffrey brown samples the poetry about greece's financial woes and its austerity measures. that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: the election commission in egypt confirmed today the new constitution won nearly 64% of the vote in a referendum. the panel also reported turnout was just a third of the country's 52 million registered voters. president mohammed morsi and his muslim brotherhood backed the draft constitution. opponents warned it paves the way for islamic rule and curbs on civil liberties. the six persian gulf arab nations demanded an end to what they called iranian interference. they issued a statement today at the end of the gulf cooperation council's annual summit. the statement gave no details. the six u.s. allied countries, also called for swift international action to end the bloodshed in syria. in central asia, a military plane crashed early this morning in kazakhstan killing 27 people including the country's head of border security. the russian-made aircraft went down near a so
story. that i would love to, thank you. >>> greece has become the gateway to hundreds of thousands of migrants to enter the country, many of them muslims. athens remains the only eu capital without unofficial moscow. now there are plans to build one next year. will the bankrupt companies -- will the bankrupt country have trouble delivering? >> underground crowded, a legal, the place of worship for muslims and athens. dozens of these poor rooms serve be a huge community. -- dozens of these prior rooms serve out a huge community. >> we respect all religions but they did not have the respect of our muslims to provide as a regular, legal mosque for our workshop. >> the shadow of a now distant past. no mosques have been built in athens since christian greece gained independence in 1832 the omi e.u. capital without. but could that change? this was the site chosen for the first mosque. but previous promises have come to nothing in there is a financial crisis. >> there was a fear in the greek society about the construction of a mosque. we must overcome these fears. it is the commitment of
with the resources at hand. -- >> the c.s. becoming like greece? >> no, that is a profoundly -- do you see as becoming like greece? >> that is a profoundly different situation. the congressional budget office says that if we stay on the course we are on, we will have a debt that is 230% of our gross domestic product of the the next 20 years. most experts say once you get a debt of more than 9% of gross domestic product, that inhibit future economic growth in a significant way. this is just about -- not just about numbers on page, it is really about opportunities for people. whether you will be able to send your kid to school, to college, whether it will be able to buy a car, my house, whether we will have economic opportunity for the people of the country. the best academic research that has been done shows that if a country's debt gets too large in relationship to the size of its economy, the economy does not grow as fast. opportunity is lost. jobs are lost. so there is a similarity with what is happening in europe and what could happen here if we don't get our house in order. >> you talk
risk at the moment? we'll keep giving greece money because we can't afford not to. we're still waiting maybe for the ecb to step in. what is the till rask? anything we didn't know about? >> lots of things we don't know. that's the problem. it is the unknown unknown as they say. i think greece is probably too small to view. i think what really bothers me is spain which i think clearly bothers the whole market. the question, a growth going to fall off a cliff or whether it muddle through and a bailout will be sufficient. as you say, we don't know the answer to that question. that remains the tail risk. until we do get close to a resolution, i'm not going to turn massively bullish. >> what's your view on that? >> i think i go along very much with what he's saying. >> what is your view on what happens to spanish growth? >> i think spain has a lot of problems at the moment. it's not seeing a lot in the domestic market. not seeing it move toward an export. in which case spanish growth is going to be very, very weak for some time to come. >> all right. good to see you. thanks very much. alan
and stalin in october of 44. dividing up -- the british forget 90% of greece and the russians would get 90% of bulgaria and hungary and they divided up that way. it was pretty cynical. but when roosevelt dies, in april of 45, his last telegram to churchill was, we always have these minor disagreements with the russians but we end up resolving them. so let's not make a big deal. there's no reason we can't maintain friendship after the war. when truman gets in there on april 12, 1945, immediately takes a different course. roosevelts alliance with the wartime alliance with the soviets was still strong at that point the truman turns to advisers who roosevelt never trusted in the first place and didn't pay heed to. people like burns and second day he flies burns through his private plane and burns gets german the same message. the soviets are breaking all of their agreements and they can't be trusted. and so what we are going to see is within two weeks the u.s. policy toward the soviet union's going to change in april 1945. by the time there's the big meeting on april 23 with molotov and on apr
into the southern belly of the nazi empire, italy and the balkans, regaining greece which is a tremendous story. everyone talks about eastern europe. as an outsider i see what about the british when they went back into greece in 1944 and started bombing the streets of athens and killing the people, the communist resistors that fought against the nazis. the british were ruthless. that is another point. people say look at what stalin did in poland. he broke the altar. i don't believe they did. i will tell you more about that. look what the british did. but we did increase in the cold war period, the early cold war period we and the truman doctrine of 47 to 49, we had american advisers and early vietnam there were already over increase read the the british coal is truly to get back the mediterranean, along the region's coming get iran back in the conflict in iran in 1945. beyond that, it's crucial. we showed that in the beautiful maps. he gets to the far east and it is the richest resources around known to britain, not us. so then it isn't -- you can't dhaka the u.s. soviet relations without talki
, washington state in surplus. illinois, the dakotas in debt. missouri is your equivalent of in greece, a permanent bailout. the thing is, whereas markets are amazing institutions for allocating existing goods and services among consumers, they are chronically bad at creating a balance between deficit and surplus regions. a geographic problem, and intertemporal. remember -- if that comes first, suddenly the money lender who later becomes a banker who later becomes wall street plays a hugely significant role in this process. the banker is the conduit of that recycling mechanism. when they get an increase in proportion as the result of their mediation of that process. given that, a failure of the banker is not the same thing as the failure of a clothes maker. suddenly, there are two things that must happen. one, society will demand that banks are not allowed to go to the wall. then bankers are affectively given carte blanche, free money for themselves. and the whole mechanism breaks down like in 2008. it is often said in the eurozone, we made a huge error in europe of binding disparate
legislator of athens in ancient greece. and he replaced the prevailing system at the time of oral, law and blood feud by a written code of rules that could only be enforced by a court. the first court system. so the rules, because they were written, were hard to get around so they were draconian rules, which is where draconian -- draco. >> wasn't he in harry potter, too? >> he was also in harry potter. i don't know.was he? >> i think he was the bad kid growing up. >> and, anyway, with that out of the way and the world hurdling to an end tomorrow, still to come, if you want to know whether or not you should be optimistic about a fiscal cliff deal -- >> oh, draco malfoy. >> oh, yeah, the young bad kid? >> the blond kid. >> he was so good he was bad. check out the markets on any given day and we're going to do just that. tell what's happening with the fiscal cliff. [ penélope ] i found the best cafe in the world. nespresso. where i never have to compromise on anything. ♪ where just one touch creates the perfect coffee. where every cappuccino and latte is only made with fresh milk. and
Search Results 0 to 32 of about 33 (some duplicates have been removed)